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MAXSwerve Wheel Evaluation

The following images will describe a rating system we have developed for determining if a MAXSwerve Wheel should still be used on your robot.
This rating system was developed from our internal testing and feedback from teams who had contacted us about their MAXSwerve Wheel failures. Please make sure that you take your team's robot design and driving style into consideration.

MAXSwerve Wheel - Plastic Evaluation

Green Wheels

Okay to keep using this wheel because it is still in good shape. There is minor wear or damage to the tread but no signs of too much axial force or scrub.

Yellow Wheels

The affected wheel should be monitored closely because it is showing signs of wear that could lead to delamination of the tread. Please be sure to check the wheel again after your next match!

Red Wheels

Red Wheels need to be replaced right away and before the next match if possible. Delamination is very likely to occur with continued use beyond this state.

Quick Reference

Axial vs. Radial

In this section, we will describe different features of the MAXSwerve Wheel and wear patterns as Axial or Radial. Here are some descriptions of what these terms mean on a MAXSwerve Wheel.
  • Radial - Describes features that occur radiating from the center of the wheel towards the tread
  • Axial - Describes features that occur side to side along the wheel’s axle
Visual Representation of Radial
Visual representation of Axial

Please see the table below for examples of wheels that demonstrate the criteria for each rating.

MAXSwerve Wheel Evaluation Details

New
Green
Yellow
Red

Brand New Wheels

Brand new MAXSwerve wheels can also be classified as Green and will not have any peeling or separation of the tread from the hard plastic core of the wheel.

Green Wheels

Green wheels show early signs of wear that will eventually lead to the tread delaminating from the core of the wheel. When evaluating green wheels it is important to note that tread depth is something to be aware of, but it will not affect the rating of the wheel.
Green wheels have little to no radial separation (or peeling) of the tread. Also, the tread is still resilient enough to spring back quickly if it is stretched along the separation.
Small cuts or gouges in the wheels do not disqualify it from being rated as green. You will also see no axial separation on green wheels.
Sometimes looking at your wheel from the top down along the tread can help you identify radial separation easily. Green wheels will have straight borders since they have not had any axial separation yet.

Yellow Wheels

Yellow wheels show moderate signs of wear that will eventually lead to the tread delaminating from the core of the wheel. When evaluating yellow wheels it is important to note that tread depth is something to be aware of, but it will not affect the rating of the wheel. Even if a MAXSwerve Wheel has near-perfect tread grooves, if there is any axial separation from the core it should be classified as yellow.
Yellow wheels have some radial separation of the tread from the core as well as clear axial separation. The tread may be able to spring back still when moved, but it will remain separated from the core.
Axial Separation on a yellow wheel is noticeable but does not interfere with the forks of your module or create excess friction in your drivetrain.
When looking at the wheel from a top-down view, you can sometimes see axial separation on a yellow wheel along the edges. Also within the axial separation, you will not be able to see the core's support posts.

Red Wheels

Red wheels show serious signs of wear that will soon lead to the tread delaminating from the core of the wheel. When evaluating red wheels it is important to note that tread depth is something to be aware of, but it will not affect the rating of the wheel. Even if a MAXSwerve Wheel has near-perfect tread grooves, if there is a large amount axial separation from the core it should be classified as red.
Red wheels have major radial separation of the tread from the core as well as clear major axial separation. The tread may not be able to spring back when moved but regardless of how the tread behaves your team should replace this wheel.
Large gaps of both radial and axial separation on a red wheel may interfere with the forks of your module or create excess friction in your drivetrain as the tread expands.
When looking at the wheel from a top-down view, you will likely be able to see axial separation of the tread from the core of a red wheel. Within the axial separation, you will also be able to see at least one core support post (shown below)